Transnistria to hold presidential elections

Transnistria’s presidential election will take place today. The breakaway state seceded from Moldova in 1990, triggering an armed conflict that

Photo: CultureRoad

Transnistria’s presidential election will take place today.

The breakaway state seceded from Moldova in 1990, triggering an armed conflict that ended with a 1992 ceasefire. Although it is claimed by Moldova and not recognized by any internationally recognized states, Transnistria is largely beyond Chisinau’s control. Bordering Ukraine, the statelet is largely subsidized by Russia, which has maintained a peacekeeping force there for 29 years.

Heavily influenced by Moscow, the neo-Soviet state is dominated by Sheriff, a sprawling conglomerate with alleged Russian ties. Sheriff funds the Obnovlenie party, which has controlled parliament since 2005. It similarly backs incumbent President Vadim Krasnoselsky, who is up for reelection. His only opponent is Sergei Pynzar, a Grigoriopol politician who has done little campaigning and whom activists allege is a prop candidate to help Krasnoselsky feign a contested election.

Expect Krasnoselsky to easily beat Pynzar today. His victory will continue Transnistria’s dependence on Moscow and cement Sheriff’s growing political clout. This will further Transnistria’ status as a region in “frozen conflict,” neither helping the breakaway state towards recognition nor deescalating the tensions its causes between Moldova and Russia. As unification with Russia is highly impractical, Krasnoselsky’s victory will do little to change the status quo.

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